The Kiyama Movement (TKM) was officially founded on May 19, 2005, the 80th anniversary of the birth of Malcolm X. The word “Kiyama” means “Resurrection” in Swahili. Interestingly enough, it also means “Judgment Day” in the same language.

TKM’s primary focus is self-improvement. The founder of TKM – Michael A. Jefferson – believes that self-improvement should be the goal of all human beings seeking to enhance the society in which we live and improve our world as a whole. He believes that the creation of a better society and world begins with the improvement of the individual.

Given the unique challenges confronting Black people in American society, TKM has been expressly designed for this population group. Although TKM places a special emphasis on the development and resurrection of Black males the movement recognizes the need for both individual and collective improvement for men and women of African descent in America and throughout the Diaspora (i.e. wherever men and women of African descent may exist in the world).

Thus, the overall goal of TKM is to improve the lives of Black people in America and throughout the Diaspora. Please note, TKM should not be measured in numbers but in the commitment of those who choose to embrace the “Kiyama Principles” and adopt TKM’s “5 Steps” towards our collective resurrection.

Please enjoy the website presentation and feel free to share it with your family and friends.

The Broken Circle (*)

The Broken Circle (*)

*The Broken Circle

The Broken Circle represents sustainability, incompletion and disconnection.  The left leg represents the black woman who has sustained the race.  The right leg represents the black man in an incomplete state of being. The gaps on the left and right which prevents the connection of the upper and lower branches represent the disconnect between those of African descent throughout the Diaspora.

Let The Work Begin!